The perfect festival!

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Primavera Sound 2016

Anúncios

The Present

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After a very successful festival circuit, running on over 180 film festivals and winning more than 50 awards, we’ve decided that it’s finally time to share “The Present” with the rest of the world.

“The Present” is a thesis short from the Institute of Animation, Visual Effects and Digital Postproduction at the Filmakademie Baden-Wuerttemberg in Ludwigsburg, Germany.
We really hope you enjoy the result of our hard work. Thanks to everyone who help creating this film and everyone who supported us during the festivals. Thanks a lot for making this such an incredible journey.
“The Present” is based on a great little comic strip by the very talented Fabio Coala.
Make sure to check out his page: mentirinhas.com.br

Soundtrack by “Zealand”
itunes.apple.com/us/album/present-feat.-septemberkind/id915500091

The Boy with a Camera for a Face

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The online premiere of the multi award winning short film from writer/director Spencer Brown. The Boy with a Camera for a Face is satirical fairy tale about a boy born with a camera instead of a head, whose every moment is transformed by the fact he is recording it. Accompanied by a voice over narration read by Steven Berkoff, the film tells an epic story in fifteen minutes about the way we live today.

Please share/like/ visit our facebook page at facebook.com/The-Boy-With-A-Camera-For-A-Face-353288858140677/

To contact the filmmakers:
Director/Writer – Spencer Brown: mail@spencerbrown.net spencerbrown.net twitter.com/thespencerbrown
DoP – Chris Moon : chrismooncinematography@gmail.com christophermoondop.com/
Production Designer: Ollie Tiong: ollietiong@gmail.com ollietiong.com
Sound Designer: Nik Zivojinovic: nikolavm27@gmail.com nikolazivojinovic.com

The websites of the candidates for the elections to President of Portugal 2016

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cms_presidenciais_2016

Today I decided to do a little research about what type of CMS’s website that supported each of the candidates for president of Portugal in 2016.
The WordPress is without any doubt the favorite CMS. But do not win these elections with an absolute majority 🙂

Another great Ad: Heineken “The Insider”

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A group of tourists are rescued from their boring tour by a true insider who takes them on a journey they are not likely to forget anytime soon. What hidden gems will they uncover along the way?

Tools for Examining the UX of Your Website Design

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by  in Web Design

The typical user upon hearing the word design will almost automatically assume that someone means how all the shapes on the screen come together, how widgets allow you to perform additional options, how different font choices differ from those of their own favorite websites. The fact of the matter is that web design goes a lot deeper than this, certainly a lot deeper than simple layout of a website. Your design is important, it can make or brake a sale, and once you’re at that stage, is where UX (User Experience) comes into play.

UX, or User Experience, when viewed correctly becomes an invaluable part of your brand. It has an immense amount of power over the perception of the users who are visiting your website/product. In simple terms, think of two cars — one used, and one brand new; you take either for a test drive, and while both have their wheels spinning, which one did you think felt better? I’ll leave it to you to answer that question.

Read up: Essential Designing Tools Which Every Graphic Designer Must Know

A good design will always provide a better user experience, so essentially a good UX is crucial for a business to have. It provides an experience to the customer that doesn’t make him question the reliablity or trustworthiness of your brand. Strictly UX oriented designs are more than just design and experience, a lot of credit has to go to psychology and its effects in our regular interactions with the material world.

If the task the user will be conducting is very complex or error-prone, a further approach is to break up the task into smaller steps so that each step can act as a quality gate before the user is allowed to move onto the next. We often see this design solution in online payment portals on retail websites, like Amazon. –source

Smashing Magazine recently also published an interesting article about becoming a leader of UX, envisioning some great points on how to become a great UX thinker. For this post, we will be looking at some of the most used tools in the industry when it comes to analyzing the User Experience of your business websites or projects that you’re working on, with emphasis on learning to understand what our customers really want from us.

Optimal Workshop

User Experience Testing Tools   Optimal Workshop

Optimal Workshop is a company that focuses on helping businesses understand the mental aspects of the design of your websites, and does so with four different products:

  • Treejack — Know why and where people get lost in your content.
  • OptimalSort — Discover how other people organize your content.
  • Chalkmark — Reveal first impressions of designs and screenshots.
  • Reframer — Collect, discover & share qualitative research.

if you need comprehensive info about the way your sites are optimized for content, this is the tool to explore.

UserTesting

UserTesting  Usability Testing Made Easy

UserTesting is all about giving you real-time constructive feedback from real people. With UserTesting you can signup to get a full review of your products in the form of audio, video and transcript. You can also individually signup for a real browsing test where you can watch in real-time as people browse your product/website on all types of devices. You can use your existing customer base, or use the one provided by UserTesting.

Convert

A B Testing Software   A B Testing Tools by Convert.com

It has been a long time since we last mentioned A/B testing on our site, but the last time we did — it was all about learning on how to grow our business with it. Convert is all about state of the art A/B testing tools for agencies, experts and businesses that want to have a foolproof idea of the design choices to make. Great list of features, reasonably priced.

CrazyEgg

Crazy Egg   Visualize where your visitors click

CrazyEgg is all about showing you why, where and what are your users doing on your website, and where exactly do they start to browse and where do they end to browse your site. It can be so vital to know where exactly users cut their connection with your website, since you could rearrange the insight to reflect those changes and have a better chance at keeping users engaged and active.

UsabilityTools

UsabilityTools   Unlock your business growth like never before

The crown jewel of UsabilityTools is their UX Suite. With the UX Suite you can get real people to talk about your visual design in real-time. Get insightful feedback on parts of your design that could be improved for all kinds of situations. On top of that, learn how your design performs in front of a larger audience, what are the flaws that many people notice all the same? There are also options to engage people in surveys to get solid data about your design.

Verify

Design Surveys with Verify

Verify is the fastest way to collect and analyze user feedback on screens, sketches, mockups or a live website. It helps you verify your assumptions and act on data rather than intuition. Here is a full interview with one of the marketing people from Verify, that talks about the deeper behind the scenes action of Verify.

ClickTale

Improve Digital Customer Experience   ClickTale

ClickTale is focused on helping businesses to optimize usability features, maximize the potential conversion rates, as well as to provide deep web analysis that can have a drastic impact on the course of the website. They’ve got their own patented software that allows you to see what your users are experiencing on your website at any given time, so as to allow you to see what kind of potential changes could be made. ClickTale is able to provide benefits such as website optimization (including for landing pages), increase return of investment rates and help with conversions, as well as fix problems with your sites, and improve the overall customer quality/experience.

Usabilla

Usabilla   A new standard in user feedback

Usabilla provides various Voice of Customer solutions that help businesses, e-commerce managers, marketing experts, designers and UX guru’s to create and improve websites based on real user feedback. They’ve got some of the best tools in terms of gathering targeted user feedback, looking at visual analysis and creating amazing surveys.

Usabilla also provides an intuitive reporting dashboard that allows you to monitor live feedback, get an aggregated overview and export the results.

Proto.io

Proto.io   Prototypes that feel real

In our post of wireframe tools, you will find no shortage of apps and tools that can provide prototyping features, but Proto.io is focused solely on that — helping you to build interactive and beautiful prototypes that require no coding. A lot of freelancers have reported this app to be particular useful at the current price that it is.

Inspectlet

Inspectlet   Website Heatmaps  Session Recording  Form Analytics

Inspectlet has built their product around letting you to gain deeper knowledge and understanding of what your visitors are doing on your website, it helps you to see what their natural course of action is when they first interact with your design. The list of features includes analytics, heatmaps, the ability to replay an interaction of a live users. Great stuff all around.

Tools for Examining the UX of Your Website Design

Each tool is built by a different group of people and designers, so each tool will certainly provide a different approach to the most important things to look out in the User Experience category. A web heatmap might be good to understand the rotation of the average user on your website, while interactive surveys can provide a more deeper understanding of the needs of your users. It’s all about being there for the users/customers, they’re the ones shaping the future of your business.

via codecondo.com

The Difference Between Good UI and Bad UI

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By 

When I visit your page (just like if I visit your house for dinner), I should feel welcomed. Good user interface makes me feel at home. Everything makes sense, and the cat isn’t hopping on the dinner table. Bad user interface is cat hair in your soup–it leaves a bad taste in your mouth and you’re ready to exit stage left quickly.

So, what exactly is user interface, anyway?

Put simply, user interface (UI) is how the site interacts with the user. It’s less about a site’s beauty and more about its usefulness in delivering the product to the user. If you’re a blogger, the product is your point-of-view; if you’re an online candle store, the product is a candle. The purpose of UI is to get the user to the product as efficiently and quickly as possible.

Consider the 4 E’s of Good UI design. UI should always be the following:
-Easy to use
-Easy to understand
-Error-free
-Effective for the end-goal (or product)

Conversely, bad UI design is sluggish, complicated, and generic. And, surprisingly, there’s little gray area. Either you have a thoughtful UI design, or you have a generic blob that doesn’t meet the requirements of your users.

What Does Good UI do?

An effective UI design is intuitive, both in how it interacts with the user and how the user interacts with the site. Good UI design has threads of familiarity. Even if I’m visiting your page or app for the first time, I should understand how it works–and quickly.

A good user interface holds my hand and takes me where I should go. Customers like hand-holding. And, that’s not an insult to your customers. Of course, what works for one site most definitely will not work for another, and that’s why testing is so important. More on that a little later.

What Does Bad UI do?

Bad UI drops you off in the middle of the desert and expects you to make it on your own to the rain forest. It does not lead you where you need to go. Too often, this is because websites try to cater to an impossibly huge demographic, so the core audience is marginalized in favor of appealing to the broader audience.

Here are 10 Examples of UI gone wrong (and how to avoid it on your site):

1. UI is not responsive.

Alex Araujo is a personal site that shows mobile responsiveness.

He’s dead, Jim. In this day and age, having a website that users must pinch to zoom on mobile web devices is embarrassing. Although zooming in isn’t difficult, it indicates that you are out of touch with your users. If you notice that your website gets a fair amount of traffic from mobile devices, you should consider updating your UI to answer the call.

Consider fat fingers and failing eyesight in your design. Not all of us are blessed with nimble finger tips.

2. UI is not intuitive.

Codrops

When you create your website or app, you should already have in mind your target customer. The usability of your design is determined by how easily your target customer can navigate around it. It doesn’t matter if adults aged 18-49 can use an app thats targeted to ages 6-10. When your UI doesn’t make sense to the user, it will be abandoned.

Strive to implement platform conventions whenever possible. Most users expect the location of the search box to be in the upper right hand corner a website. Or visited links to change color. Users will feel at home with design elements that they expect. By all means, be creative, but don’t sacrifice user experience.

3. Design is inconsistent.

Earth911

The tone of your website should be fairly consistent on every page. A reader shouldn’t feel as if they are on a totally different website from one page to the next. Maintain uniform navigation and a decisive tone throughout.

4. There is no target.

Who is your target user? If that is not immediately evident on the first page, you’ve lost. Many generic websites are offered to the masses, but very few succeed.

Remember an important principle, known as Pareto’s Principle aka 80/20 rule.

In this case: 80% of your sales come from 20% of your customers.

This principle is true for whatever type of website or app you have, whether you’re monetizing it or it’s just for fun. It’s infinitely more important to find out who those 20% are, and tailor your website just for them.

5. Social interaction is lacking.

TeuxDeux

Users need to feel validated in choosing to spend time on your site. One of the most powerful ways to fill that need is through touting your popularity. Implement social tools on your website, such as comment forms. Showcase your number of subscribers on your newsletter sign-up. Post recommendations or reviews from satisfied users, with images and links to their websites.

6. There is no direction.

Your Memoir

This point goes back to hand-holding. Figure out what your bottom line is. What do you want users to get from your site or app? Is it entertainment, a good, or a service? Whatever the end-goal, you must lead them to it. When I visit your site, I shouldn’t be met with a lot of information that will possibly distract me from the goal.

This is precisely why a blog plastered with ads doesn’t work nearly as well as a blog with one or two carefully placed endorsements. When you narrow the focus, you control the path.

7. The forms are too needy.

Foogi.me

The only thing worse than a long, drawn-out form is one with unclear error messages. As emphasized in the 4 E’s of Good UI, you want the user interface to be error-free, but form fields will challenge everything you know about usability.

It’s important to allow your users to be humans, and humans make errors. Your form fields should accommodate the user by offering to correct misspelled words or inline error validation. Another good UI design is pre-filled forms, populated from information filled out on other pages within your site.

Also, consider requiring less information from users upfront. It’s already a hassle to register for one more site, so make your registration be as painless as possible, which leads me to the next step.

8. Lack of social login.

Klout

Social login is so important on the web, right now. The seemingly disparate parts are coming together. If you’ve configured your website as its own isolated community, you’ve done a disservice to yourself and your users. Everything is connected.

Instead of asking users to sign up cold, integrate the social login, where you allow them to connect to your site through social media, such as:

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Google+
  • LinkedIn

The benefits are that it’s less work for the user, and it allows you to have more information about that user had they registered to your website cold, like photos.

Of course, be sure to allow users the option to sign up the traditional way. Some users do not use social media, or may prefer to have a separate interaction with your site.

9. It is slow.

Slow is evil. We’re talking seconds, but it can make a huge difference in whether the user sticks around to wait for the page to finish loading. A slow website can hurt you.

To counteract this, implement best practices for website speed. These best practices include:

  • minimizing your HTTP requests by unifying elements and using CSS Sprites
  • combining style sheets
  • enabling compression to reduce bandwidth.
  • Use .jpg and .png and compress those images as much as possible without losing quality. For .png specifically, this is a nice tool I use to reduce the file size: tinypng.com

10. There are readability issues.

Symbolset

Good user interface also tackles content. It’s nice to have engaging content, but if it’s presented in the wrong way, users will not read it, and it may come back to haunt you.

The most important thing you need to know about usability is that most people don’t read, they scan; and if the scan seems interesting, they’ll skim; and if the content is bursting with personality (ahem), then they’ll read. But, the first point is creating scannable text. Do this by using subheadings, bullets and highlighted text.

Next comes the appropriate use of font and size. Text size should always be bigger than what you think, generally hovering around 16 pixels, but compensate for your font.

Last, but not least, is content. Make your content relatable for your target audience and easy to read. Remember, user interface is how the site interacts with the user.
So, now that you’ve had a rundown of the main points of good and bad UI, here are 5 questions you should ask yourself about your current design:

1. Who is your target audience?
2. Why are users coming to your site? What is the user hoping to solve by visiting?
3. Can Grandma use it? Is it painfully simple? If not, start over.
4. Are you effectively leading users to your target?
5. What is the clear solution?

After you answer these questions, it’s time to start testing out your site. Testing is a necessary component to efficient UI. Fortunately, testing can be done easily and inexpensively with automated testing. The key rules to follow when testing, as outlined by Jakob Nielsen, are: Get representative users; ask them to perform representative tasks; shut up and let them do the talking.

Good UI is actually not complicated, at all. It’s about simplifying the focus.

via dburnsdesign.com